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Improving the Safety and Quality of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables: A Training Manual for Trainers

Authors: 
James W. Rushing, PhD, Professor Emeritus Clemson University,
Elizabeth A. Bihn, PhD, Cornell University,
Amy E. Brown, PhD, University of Maryland,
Capt. Thomas Hill, MPH, Food and Drug Administration,
John W. Jones, PhD, U.S. Food and Drug Administration,
Y. Martin Lo, PhD, University of Maryland,
Sherri A. McGarry, MS, U.S. Food and Drug Administration,
Joyce Saltsman, PhD, U.S. Food and Drug Administration,
Michelle Smith, PhD, U.S. Food and Drug Administration,
Trevor V. Suslow, PhD, University of California-Davis
Organizational Authors: 
Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition,
University of Maryland,
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Year Published: 
2010
This manual was developed to serve as the basis for JIFSAN and other training programs for GAP and GMP of fresh fruits and vegetables. It provides uniform, broadbased scientific and practical information in a Train-the-Trainer approach. Although the primary user of this manual is the JIFSAN training team, the intent is that there will be many secondary users that would include managers of production and handling operations, Extension workers, and anyone else who has the responsibility of conducting food safety training for fresh fruits and vegetables. Thus the first objective of the manual is to provide a teaching tool that serves as the foundation for JIFSAN to train trainers in countries that export foods to the U.S and the second objective is to provide a resource that assists these newly trained trainers with developing and conducting their own courses. 
The scope of information provided in this manual is international. The principles of safe production and handling presented herein will apply uniformly throughout the world, including areas within the U.S. It addresses microbiological, chemical and physical hazards that exist everywhere and offers the best available information for controlling these hazards. This training manual focuses on risk reduction, not risk elimination. Current technologies cannot eliminate all potential food safety risks associated with the consumption of raw produce. Instructors and trainees should work together during the course to identify risks and practical management strategies for reducing those risks.
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